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DATA For The Scholarship Driven Parent

Category: Uncategorised
Published: Monday, 05 December 2016

DATA TIME For the race that doesnt exist
Seventy percent of all children playing youth sports at the age of 10, which is the #1 age for participation in the country, quit by the time they are 13. People like to say they have other interests, but the data say there are three main reasons:
1. They are not having fun
2. Too much pressure from coaches and parents to win
3. Lack of playing time.
Now, you couple this data with the facts that only about 1% of all children that go to a four-year school play at the Division I level and that the average Division I scholarship, excluding Football and Basketball, is $8,700 a year, and you have a cauldron brewing where irrational thought and behavior will eventually boil over to justify the commitment to winning. The data do not support the time, money, and end-of-the-rainbow wishful thinking results.

Slow Cooking

Category: Uncategorised
Published: Monday, 28 November 2016

Since the male and female bodies don’t fully develop until the children are into their early 20s, around 23, 24, and 25 years of age, it becomes disingenuous to the process to try and make these children into something they are not capable of being at an early age and won’t be when they get older. Would you teach a 10 year old Physics?

The Corner Stone Philosophy of Frozen Shorts

Category: Uncategorised
Published: Monday, 21 November 2016

We use Science instead of tradition, psychology instead of hunches, and data instead of theory to bring soltyions to youth and high school sports problems.Our data and research on a national level show that about 10% of the children who are better than the rest of the other athletes at pre-puberty ages maintain and grow to be the best athletes when they are 17 or 18. Burnout, injuries, and other interests are mitigating factors to this phenomenon. Besides, children change their minds all the time. Isn’t it better to give them a fundamental base applicable to all areas of life rather than a sports-specific, myopic one?

Since the male and female bodies don’t fully develop until the children are into their early 20s, around 23, 24, and 25 years of age, it becomes disingenuous to the process to try and make these children into something they are not capable of being at an early age and won’t be when they get older. Would you teach a 10 year old Physics?

PRESSURE PRESSURE PRESSURE

Category: Uncategorised
Published: Monday, 14 November 2016

Diane Scavuzzo: In today’s highly competitive youth soccer environment, are parents and some coaches pushing their kids too hard?

VJ Stanley: The simple answer is yes. However, there is much more to that question than just a simple answer. The question to the question is why. Why are parents and coaches putting so much pressure on children at younger and younger ages to be very competitive and win?

The next question to those two questions is, do they have the facts to know whether this is even healthy for their children and players, both mentally and physically? Then they need to get to the question of if there is a long-term benefit to them by being so competitive, and the mantra that more is better. Now we have a fundamental base from which to continue, to be able to answer the question fully.

Let me start with the premise that just about anything that a child does pre-puberty will not have a long-term net gain on a child’s athletic success. Puberty changes everything.